Early 3rd Millenium

Now with 10% more average tumblr posts.

213 notes

Utility shutoff

wingedbeastie:

So I just got a good look at the PGW shut off notice.

I have 3 days to get $208 dollars.

If they shut off the gas it’s going to cost $468 to turn it back on.

If they have to dig up the street to do it, its another $372 (almost $850 total)

I have a donation button in the description, if anyone would like to help.

Signal boosting is appreciated.

(via lisaquestions)

61,552 notes

chekhovandowl:

faitherinhicks:

leseanthomas:

OMFG. THIS. SHOW.

weirdly relevant to the question I answered yesterday.

Just repeat to yourself “This isn’t the Olympics, it’s an industry” and go make those comics!!!!!!!!!

This is actually ridiculously important, and I had a similar kind of revelation at some point.

"It’s gonna be amateurs reading it."

Meaning, you’re not catering to a whole bunch of well-known, high-standard artists. You’re gonna be drawing for normal people, and they’re gonna be pretty fucking impressed. 

(via lisaquestions)

70,200 notes

madamethursday:

[Image: a split picture. One side is a photo of a Black man wearing glasses in a hospital bed with oxygen tubing under his nose. The other side is a sign that reads: “My name is Michael Hunter. I was diagnosed with leukemia in June 2013 & was told on June 11, 2014 that I only have a few months left to live if I can’t find a donor. Please help me with my biological family or a donor match! I was born in Columbus, OH 3/1/1985 at Doctor’s North Hospital and given the name Christopher Brown. Please share”.]
fierceawakening:

poeticrican:

grrrls-fighting-back:

"My name is Michael Hunter. I was diagnosed with leukemia in June 2013 & was told on June 11, 2014 that I only have a few months left to live if I can’t find a donor. Please help me with my biological family or a donor match! I was born in Columbus, OH 3/1/1985 at Doctor’s North Hospital and given the name Christopher Brown. Please share"
Michael is a friend, I’m asking that you all take the time to share this. He desperately needs a bone marrow donor and there is very limited number of African American donors. Without a donor Michael is going to die.
Michael was adopted and does not know his birth family. We know he has a half brother but have no information about him.
He does not specifically need an African American Donor but because of all of the things that factor into finding a match (blood type, dna tissue etc.) , someone of similar descent is more likely to be a closer match.
If anyone knows anything about Michael’s birth family or if you would like to see if you are a match, please privately message me. I can put you in touch with him and his caregivers directly!
We hope through spreading awareness we can either find his birth family whom he does not know or find a donor match. Michael lives in the Cincinnati, OH area. Please dont just like this or scroll past. Please share this! You could save his life!

BOOST. Its so hard for Black people to find donors.

Signal boost

madamethursday:

[Image: a split picture. One side is a photo of a Black man wearing glasses in a hospital bed with oxygen tubing under his nose. The other side is a sign that reads: “My name is Michael Hunter. I was diagnosed with leukemia in June 2013 & was told on June 11, 2014 that I only have a few months left to live if I can’t find a donor. Please help me with my biological family or a donor match! I was born in Columbus, OH 3/1/1985 at Doctor’s North Hospital and given the name Christopher Brown. Please share”.]

fierceawakening:

poeticrican:

grrrls-fighting-back:

"My name is Michael Hunter. I was diagnosed with leukemia in June 2013 & was told on June 11, 2014 that I only have a few months left to live if I can’t find a donor. Please help me with my biological family or a donor match! I was born in Columbus, OH 3/1/1985 at Doctor’s North Hospital and given the name Christopher Brown. Please share"

Michael is a friend, I’m asking that you all take the time to share this. He desperately needs a bone marrow donor and there is very limited number of African American donors. Without a donor Michael is going to die.

Michael was adopted and does not know his birth family. We know he has a half brother but have no information about him.

He does not specifically need an African American Donor but because of all of the things that factor into finding a match (blood type, dna tissue etc.) , someone of similar descent is more likely to be a closer match.

If anyone knows anything about Michael’s birth family or if you would like to see if you are a match, please privately message me. I can put you in touch with him and his caregivers directly!

We hope through spreading awareness we can either find his birth family whom he does not know or find a donor match. Michael lives in the Cincinnati, OH area. Please dont just like this or scroll past. Please share this! You could save his life!

BOOST. Its so hard for Black people to find donors.

Signal boost

(via karnythia)

38,457 notes

madlori:

jmathieson-fic:

mumblingsage:

decodethefallenmoon:

molokoko:

amazing

“Just so everyone is aware, there is a bunch of misleading info being spread around re: ALS research - the “27%” figure is based on previous years’ annual funding; furthermore, the remainder goes to improving the quality of life of those suffering from ALS. Given that the annual funding is approximately 16M, that’s just over 4M spent on decreasing their suffering. It isn’t greed, it’s a lack of money.”Shut up already.

The ALS Association has a 4-star rating from Charity Watchdog. 
And the next time you start to complain about a charity either a) working on multiple fronts (because that’s what ALSA does—both seeking a cure and helping people suffering now) or b) daring to have administration expenses—let’s see how long you can last, much less tackle a cause, without printer paper and an internet connection. 

As someone who has watched a family member die from a neuro-degenerative disease; funding to develop better wheelchairs and bedsore creams is *just* as important as funding research to cure the disease itself…

A friend of mine posted an update from one of HER friends to FB earlier.  Her dad has ALS.  The ALS foundation came out to see if they could put in a ramp for his wheelchair, but they couldn’t afford it because of the kind of ramp he needed for the kind of house they had.
This week they called back and said hey, the thing is, we suddenly have a bunch of money, so we’re coming out to build that ramp.  And they did.  She posted pics.
So if you feel like bitching about the ice bucket challenge…reconsider.

madlori:

jmathieson-fic:

mumblingsage:

decodethefallenmoon:

molokoko:

amazing

Just so everyone is aware, there is a bunch of misleading info being spread around re: ALS research - the “27%” figure is based on previous years’ annual funding; furthermore, the remainder goes to improving the quality of life of those suffering from ALS. Given that the annual funding is approximately 16M, that’s just over 4M spent on decreasing their suffering. It isn’t greed, it’s a lack of money.”

Shut up already.

The ALS Association has a 4-star rating from Charity Watchdog. 

And the next time you start to complain about a charity either a) working on multiple fronts (because that’s what ALSA does—both seeking a cure and helping people suffering now) or b) daring to have administration expenses—let’s see how long you can last, much less tackle a cause, without printer paper and an internet connection. 

As someone who has watched a family member die from a neuro-degenerative disease; funding to develop better wheelchairs and bedsore creams is *just* as important as funding research to cure the disease itself…

A friend of mine posted an update from one of HER friends to FB earlier.  Her dad has ALS.  The ALS foundation came out to see if they could put in a ramp for his wheelchair, but they couldn’t afford it because of the kind of ramp he needed for the kind of house they had.

This week they called back and said hey, the thing is, we suddenly have a bunch of money, so we’re coming out to build that ramp.  And they did.  She posted pics.

So if you feel like bitching about the ice bucket challenge…reconsider.

(via the-goddamazon)

91,145 notes

book one:
professor mcgonagall and the you put a WHAT in our WHERE albus
book two:
professor mcgonagall and the we have a WHAT IN OUR WHERE ALBUS
book three:
professor mcgonagall and the ministry is sending us WHAT because of WHO
book four:
professor mcgonagall and the ARE YOU SHITTING ME ALBUS
book five:
professor mcgonagall and the we have WHO telling us to do WHAT
book six:
professor mcgonagall and the albus do something NO NOT THAT
book seven:
professor mcgonagall and the I FINALLY GET TO BLOW SHIT UP THANK YOU WIZARD GOD

1,169 notes

disabilityhistory:

allyourfavesarebi:

saxas:

disabilityhistory:

New York state has officially changed its standard accessibility icon from the static blue wheelchair symbol to a newer, more active figure.
Image description: Empty parking lot with several disability parking spaces featuring the new disability icon, which shows a stick figure leaning forward and actively pushing their own wheels. 

This isn’t bad necessarily, but there is something about it that, as a disabled person who uses a wheelchair, I don’t like. Disabled people have this overwhelming pressure to be quick, to be fast, in essence - get out of abled people’s way. Being active is an ideal imposed on us since birth by abled people - and if you fail to live up to that ideal, abled people see that as reason enough to believe you are not worthy of being treated with basic human dignity and respect. 
Not being active is NOT a bad thing. 

I’m still thinking about this bc it just reeks of abled ppl bs. like ok they say:“This bill is an important step toward correcting society’s understanding of accessibility and eliminating a stigma”but are you really doing anything to make places more accessible? the article doesn’t mention actually doing anything that would make a tangible difference for disabled people. putting up a new sign with a new design doesn’t make a space any more accessible than it was before.

I don’t hate it, but I’m ambivalent about it.
First, no, neither the NY state legislature nor the Accessible Icon project that designed it years ago (it started as a guerrilla art project) seem to be making material improvements in accessibility. And when disabled people feel the need to to describe or depict ourselves as being “active” (or “strong” or “healthy” or anything else), we’re investing in the same ableist norms that are used to disparage us or others like us. Some of us are active or healthy or strong, but we aren’t all, and we shouldn’t have to be.
With that said…I do believe that representation can make a difference. And I hope, specifically, that this kind of icon might reduce the amount of people who grab our wheelchairs or assistive devices and think they are “helping.” Because whether we are active or not, whether we need help or not, we do not want you to just grab us out of nowhere without permission.

disabilityhistory:

allyourfavesarebi:

saxas:

disabilityhistory:

New York state has officially changed its standard accessibility icon from the static blue wheelchair symbol to a newer, more active figure.

Image description: Empty parking lot with several disability parking spaces featuring the new disability icon, which shows a stick figure leaning forward and actively pushing their own wheels. 

This isn’t bad necessarily, but there is something about it that, as a disabled person who uses a wheelchair, I don’t like. Disabled people have this overwhelming pressure to be quick, to be fast, in essence - get out of abled people’s way. Being active is an ideal imposed on us since birth by abled people - and if you fail to live up to that ideal, abled people see that as reason enough to believe you are not worthy of being treated with basic human dignity and respect. 

Not being active is NOT a bad thing. 

I’m still thinking about this bc it just reeks of abled ppl bs. like ok they say:
“This bill is an important step toward correcting society’s understanding of accessibility and eliminating a stigma”
but are you really doing anything to make places more accessible? the article doesn’t mention actually doing anything that would make a tangible difference for disabled people. putting up a new sign with a new design doesn’t make a space any more accessible than it was before.

I don’t hate it, but I’m ambivalent about it.

First, no, neither the NY state legislature nor the Accessible Icon project that designed it years ago (it started as a guerrilla art project) seem to be making material improvements in accessibility. And when disabled people feel the need to to describe or depict ourselves as being “active” (or “strong” or “healthy” or anything else), we’re investing in the same ableist norms that are used to disparage us or others like us. Some of us are active or healthy or strong, but we aren’t all, and we shouldn’t have to be.

With that said…I do believe that representation can make a difference. And I hope, specifically, that this kind of icon might reduce the amount of people who grab our wheelchairs or assistive devices and think they are “helping.” Because whether we are active or not, whether we need help or not, we do not want you to just grab us out of nowhere without permission.

Filed under ableism tw