Early 3rd Millenium

Now with 10% more average tumblr posts.

90,460 notes

book one:
professor mcgonagall and the you put a WHAT in our WHERE albus
book two:
professor mcgonagall and the we have a WHAT IN OUR WHERE ALBUS
book three:
professor mcgonagall and the ministry is sending us WHAT because of WHO
book four:
professor mcgonagall and the ARE YOU SHITTING ME ALBUS
book five:
professor mcgonagall and the we have WHO telling us to do WHAT
book six:
professor mcgonagall and the albus do something NO NOT THAT
book seven:
professor mcgonagall and the I FINALLY GET TO BLOW SHIT UP THANK YOU WIZARD GOD

1,086 notes

disabilityhistory:

allyourfavesarebi:

saxas:

disabilityhistory:

New York state has officially changed its standard accessibility icon from the static blue wheelchair symbol to a newer, more active figure.
Image description: Empty parking lot with several disability parking spaces featuring the new disability icon, which shows a stick figure leaning forward and actively pushing their own wheels. 

This isn’t bad necessarily, but there is something about it that, as a disabled person who uses a wheelchair, I don’t like. Disabled people have this overwhelming pressure to be quick, to be fast, in essence - get out of abled people’s way. Being active is an ideal imposed on us since birth by abled people - and if you fail to live up to that ideal, abled people see that as reason enough to believe you are not worthy of being treated with basic human dignity and respect. 
Not being active is NOT a bad thing. 

I’m still thinking about this bc it just reeks of abled ppl bs. like ok they say:“This bill is an important step toward correcting society’s understanding of accessibility and eliminating a stigma”but are you really doing anything to make places more accessible? the article doesn’t mention actually doing anything that would make a tangible difference for disabled people. putting up a new sign with a new design doesn’t make a space any more accessible than it was before.

I don’t hate it, but I’m ambivalent about it.
First, no, neither the NY state legislature nor the Accessible Icon project that designed it years ago (it started as a guerrilla art project) seem to be making material improvements in accessibility. And when disabled people feel the need to to describe or depict ourselves as being “active” (or “strong” or “healthy” or anything else), we’re investing in the same ableist norms that are used to disparage us or others like us. Some of us are active or healthy or strong, but we aren’t all, and we shouldn’t have to be.
With that said…I do believe that representation can make a difference. And I hope, specifically, that this kind of icon might reduce the amount of people who grab our wheelchairs or assistive devices and think they are “helping.” Because whether we are active or not, whether we need help or not, we do not want you to just grab us out of nowhere without permission.

disabilityhistory:

allyourfavesarebi:

saxas:

disabilityhistory:

New York state has officially changed its standard accessibility icon from the static blue wheelchair symbol to a newer, more active figure.

Image description: Empty parking lot with several disability parking spaces featuring the new disability icon, which shows a stick figure leaning forward and actively pushing their own wheels. 

This isn’t bad necessarily, but there is something about it that, as a disabled person who uses a wheelchair, I don’t like. Disabled people have this overwhelming pressure to be quick, to be fast, in essence - get out of abled people’s way. Being active is an ideal imposed on us since birth by abled people - and if you fail to live up to that ideal, abled people see that as reason enough to believe you are not worthy of being treated with basic human dignity and respect. 

Not being active is NOT a bad thing. 

I’m still thinking about this bc it just reeks of abled ppl bs. like ok they say:
“This bill is an important step toward correcting society’s understanding of accessibility and eliminating a stigma”
but are you really doing anything to make places more accessible? the article doesn’t mention actually doing anything that would make a tangible difference for disabled people. putting up a new sign with a new design doesn’t make a space any more accessible than it was before.

I don’t hate it, but I’m ambivalent about it.

First, no, neither the NY state legislature nor the Accessible Icon project that designed it years ago (it started as a guerrilla art project) seem to be making material improvements in accessibility. And when disabled people feel the need to to describe or depict ourselves as being “active” (or “strong” or “healthy” or anything else), we’re investing in the same ableist norms that are used to disparage us or others like us. Some of us are active or healthy or strong, but we aren’t all, and we shouldn’t have to be.

With that said…I do believe that representation can make a difference. And I hope, specifically, that this kind of icon might reduce the amount of people who grab our wheelchairs or assistive devices and think they are “helping.” Because whether we are active or not, whether we need help or not, we do not want you to just grab us out of nowhere without permission.

Filed under ableism tw

105 notes

kenzburp:

Anyone out there, me and my family really need help.  We’re barely scraping by and I am begging anyone for help.

We have barely any dog food, and we haven’t been able to get a decent amount of groceries in a while.  We have several bills that we have to keep asking to pay later, and I’m worried for my family.

I have a gofundme set up for my dog, but if you donated there, it would be going to help me and my family, and my dog right now.

Again, sorry to ask for help, but I’m desperate to help my family.

http://www.gofundme.com/9iw8io

(via obstinatecondolement)

Filed under signal boost

6,363 notes

polllyanna:

"derp/herp derp" is ableist stop fucking using it, it is a term that originated with making fun of kids with down syndrome and being like "ha ha derp face:-P" and it has been used against disabled people for so long after that, please stop using it, get mad at people that do use it, please

Afaik it didn’t start as a slur. But doesn’t matter if it wasn’t originally ableist. It’s ableist now. It’s used to make fun of disabilities now. It’s not okay.

(via rumplestiltsqueer-deactivated20)

Filed under ableism tw slurs tw

4 notes

This is a revolution that we are encountering now. For all of the thousands of years of recorded human history, about 5,000 years, there is no instance of any culture, nation or tribe ever having as the established standard for marriage anything other than between man and woman. It may have been multiple women and a man, it may have been something like that, but it was always between men and women.

Michele Bachman

I know she is wrong wrong wrong, as wrong as wrong can be… but can someone more informed than me please explain how wrong she is? Thank you.

(via porcelain-horse-horselain)

Explanations like this?

253,877 notes

yamino:

winawinadajcie:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though
why was there temporary internet
with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!
In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).
In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.


Cool!

Huh!

yamino:

winawinadajcie:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!

In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).

In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

Cool!

Huh!

(Source: neilcicierega, via thingsstingshouldsing)

Filed under casual ableism tw